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Find the facts about COVID-19

The latest information on coronavirus disease in NSW.

NSW COVID-19 statistics*

*Last updated 8pm, 3 April 2020. Source: NSW Health

Help slow the spread of COVID-19

We must all help slow the spread of the coronavirus, save lives and protect our health workers. The single most important thing we can do is stay home and limit contact with others.

Anyone can catch and spread it without knowing, putting everyone at risk, particularly those with weakened immunity systems, ongoing medical conditions and people over 60. By staying at home, you can help us slow the spread and together we will save lives.

115,140
people tested and cleared
2493
people with confirmed cases

including interstate residents in NSW health care facilities

12
lives lost

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in NSW by postcode

 

This map shows confirmed COVID-19 cases only based on location of usual residence, not necessarily where the virus was contracted. Cases without a NSW residential address are not shown. The case definition of a confirmed case is a person who tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or has the virus identified by electron microscopy or viral culture, at a reference laboratory. Data updated at 8pm, 3 April 2020.

Data Source: Confirmed COVID-19 cases - NSW Ministry of Health, Population Data - Australian Bureau of Statistics

COVID-19 tables

Age and sex breakdown of confirmed cases reported in NSW

 

Table: Number of confirmed COVID-19 cases by age group and gender in NSW, reported up to 8pm 3 April 2020

 

Age group Female Male Total
0-9 9 12 21
10-19 43 37 80
20-29 303 243 546
30-39 203 195 398
40-49 130 182 312
50-59 193 191 384
60-69 204 190 394
70-79 119 139 258
80-89 35 44 79
90-100 10 11 21
Total 1249 1244 2493

Likely source of infection of confirmed cases reported in NSW

 

Table: Number of confirmed COVID-19 cases by likely source of infection in NSW, reported up to 8pm 3 April 2020

 

Source Cases
Overseas acquired 1524
Locally acquired – contac​t of a confirmed case and/or in a known cluster 551
Locally acquired – contact not identified 365
Under investigation 53
Total

2493

Note: Counts reported for a particular day may vary over time due to ongoing investigations and case review.

Number of confirmed cases, tests, percent positivity, and rates of cases and tests per 100,000 residents of each Local Health District (LHD) in NSW, reported up to 8pm 2 April 2020

 

LHD

Cases

Tests

Percent positive

Cases per 100,000 resid​ents

Tests per 100,000 residents

South Eastern Sydney

531

16,953

3.13

55.36

1767.59

Northern Sydney

430

17,609

2.44

44.98

1842.1

Central Coast

108

4492

2.4

30.61

1273.02

Sydney

179

10,142

1.76

25.69

1455.57

Nepean Blue Mountains

99

5979

1.66

25.32

1529.20

Hunter New England

241

11,189

2.15

25.30

1174.84

Illawarra Shoalhaven

99

5371

1.84

23.59

1279.99

Southern NSW

51

1960

2.6

23.49

902.93

Western Sydney

223

12,679

1.63

21.17

1298.52

Mid North Coast

46

2597

1.77

20.38

1150.82

South Western Sydney

173

112,503

1.38

16.66

1203.91

Northern NSW

45

2394

1.88

14.50

771.36

Murrumbidgee

40

1791

2.23

13.42

600.79

Western NSW

38

2406

1.58

13.33

844.17

Far West

2

196

1.02

6.63

650.21

NSW Total

2389

114,455

2.09

29.18

1398.19

Notes:

  • LHD counts and rates do not include results for those who did not provide a full or valid address, or who supplied an interstate or international address.
  • Case counts reported for a particular day may vary over time due to ongoing investigations and case review.

Related information

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses.

Some coronaviruses cause illness in humans. Others cause illness in animals, such as bats, camels and civets.

Human coronaviruses generally cause mild illness, such as the common cold.

Rarely, animal coronaviruses can evolve to infect and spread among humans, causing severe diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) (2002) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) (2012).

COVID-19 is a new strain of coronavirus that has not been previously identified in humans. It is closely related to a bat coronavirus.

It was first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, where it has caused a large and ongoing outbreak. Cases have since been identified across the world. 

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a pandemic.

The WHO used this declaration to call for urgent and aggressive action. They noted that this is a pandemic that can be controlled. Both China and the Republic of Korea have significantly declining outbreaks.

In Australia, the people most at risk of getting COVID-19 are those who have:

  • recently returned from overseas
  • been in close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19.

There is also evidence of limited spread of COVID-19 in the Australian community.

Based on what we know so far about COVID-19 and what we know about other coronaviruses, those at greatest risk of serious infection are:

  • people aged 65 years and over
  • people with chronic medical conditions
  • people with impaired or compromised immune systems
  • people with diagnosed chronic medical conditions
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, as they have higher rates of chronic illness 
  • very young children and babies.*

*At this stage the risk to children and babies, and the role children play in the transmission of COVID-19, is not clear. So far there has been a low rate of confirmed COVID-19 cases among children, relative to the broader population.

It is important to remember that even healthy young adults can have severe disease caused by COVID-19.

People living in group residential settings are at greater risk of being exposed to outbreaks of COVID-19 if a case is diagnosed in a resident or staff member. This includes:

  • people living in residential aged care facilities and disability group homes
  • people in detention facilities
  • students in boarding schools
  • people on cruise ships.

People living in some group residential settings are also more likely to have conditions that make them at greater risk of serious COVID-19 infection.

According to the WHO, it is not certain how long the virus that causes COVID-19 lasts on surfaces. Studies suggest that coronaviruses (including preliminary information on the COVID-19 virus) may persist on surfaces for a few hours or up to several days. This may vary under different conditions, including the type of surface, temperature or humidity of the environment.

If you think a surface may be infected, clean it with a common household disinfectant to kill the virus. Clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth or nose. 

The infection period for the virus will vary from person-to-person. Mild symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual may resolve over just a few days. Similar to influenza, for an individual with other ongoing health issues, such as a respiratory condition, recovery may take weeks and in severe cases could be potentially fatal. 

The nose/throat swab for COVID-19 looks for virus present in your nose and throat.

If you have had a negative test and you are in quarantine — as a returned traveller or a close contact of a case — you must remain in quarantine.
 
A negative test can mean that:

  • you didn’t have COVID-19 at the time of testing and you didn’t meet the criteria for diagnosis so you no longer need to self-isolate
  • COVID-19 couldn’t be found on the test even though you are infected. As the virus needs to multiply in your nose/throat for it to be found, if you are early in the disease process it won’t be found on the swab.
  • you have previously had a positive test showing that you had COVID-19, you have recovered from COVID-19, you have cleared the virus and we can no longer find it.
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